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20110701
20110731
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
of rupert murdoch's top deputies. elizabeth palmer is in london with more. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the police investigation is getting very serious now. one of the main lines of inquiry is going to determine or try and determine whether senior officers of murdoch's company knew of or were involved in unethical or especially illegal activity. mobbed by reporters in london, rupert murdoch plowed through, all smiles, to have dinners with his embattled ceo rebekah brooks. she'll be questioned by police later this week. there is a scramble inside murdoch's media empire to control toxic fallout from the "news of the world" hacking scandal which could start waves in the u.s. >> there are waves of could it have happened here? there are locks of reporters at any given time on the ground in the u.s., many stories, many of its celebrity stories are datelined here. >> reporter: the scandal broke last week with the case of milly dowler, a teenager murdered in 2002. her parents and thousands of others discovered that personal voice messages had been hacked by "news of the world" journal
with a heartbreaker tonight. we'll show you the apology in the last paper and what it might mean for rupert murdoch. [ man ] i got this new citi thankyou card and started earning loads of points. you got a weather balloon with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just about anything. ♪ ♪ there it is. [ man ] so i used mine to get a whole new perspective. ♪ [ male announcer ] the new citi thankyou premier card gives you more ways to earn points. what's your story? citi can help you write it. >>> there's word tonight that the san francisco police union has voted to accept a deal with the city that will allow them to receive raises and avoid layoffs while paying more for their pensions. the chronicle is reporting police will get a 3% pay raise immediately. the remaining 2% next year. the deal also requires police to pay an additional 3% to their pensions. this year it's a wash, it's supposed to save the city $10 million over the next two years. trying to get a pension reform measure on the ballot in november. in 2009 there were 52 members of the san francisco police department who m
with the international space station on sunday for the very last time. >>> news corp.'s rupert murdoch flew to london to personally deal with the phone-hacking scandal that threatens to hobble his entire media empire as new allegations have surfaced that journalists from murdoch's now infamous "news of the world" newspaper may have tried to hack the phones of 9/11 victims. england's "daily mail" reports a former new york city cop now working as a private investigator claims "news of the world" reporters offered to pay him for victims' phone numbers and details of the calls they made and received in the days leading up to the 9/11 attacks. despite murdoch shting down the 168-year-old paper innen effort to extinguish the scandal, it is now seen as threatening a multibillion dollar pay tv deal. >>> in russia, nine people are dead and nearly 100 more are missing after an overloaded ferry sank on the volga river on sunday. russian authorities said 185 people were crowded on board an aging double-decker tour boat that had a maximum capacity of 120. one survivor told russian tv that the crew was only able t
the scandal that rattled rupert murdoch's media empire. they reached the british government today, as a former spokesman for prime minister david cameron was arrested. abc's jeffrey kofman now on the tabloid world out of control. >> reporter: when andy coulson was editor of "the news of the world," the paper he ran destroyed people's lives. >> i'm afraid i can'n'say anymore at this stage. >> reporter: arrested this morning, facing charges of perjury, bribing police, hacking people's phones in search of scoops. andy coulson is also uncomfortably the former spokesman of british prime minister david cameron, who, today, scrambled to distance himself. >> but press freedom does not mean the press should be above the law. >> reporter: but "the news of the world" w w, which is why the famous and the powerful in britain have feared and loathed the tabloid for years. case in point? remember when sarah ferguson was caught selling access to prince andrew? >> 500,000 pounds when you can, to me -- open doors. reporter: and this headline. when prince harry angered his girlfrfrnd by visiting a strip club. ho
. the final edition is being prepared right now. the last edition comes out tomorrow. rupert murdoch who owns the paper decided to shut it down after allegations surfaced that its journalists illegally hacked phone messages belonging to murder and terrorist victims. rupert murdoch is expected to arrive in london tomorrow to deal with this crisis. >>> coming up, we will have a live report from london on the fallout from the scandal and what it could mean for the rest of rupert murdoch's vast media empire. >>> and the media everywhere have joined the chase after these two, the royal couple now on their whirlwind itinerary in southern california. but the duke and duchess of cambridge also have serious work ahead of them. ♪ ♪ look at that car, well, it goes fast ♪ ♪ givin' my dad a heart attack ♪ [ friend ] that is so awesome. ♪ i love my car [ engine revving ] [ male announcer ] that first chevy, yea, it gets under your skin. ♪ control your budget? yes. our "name your price" tool shows you a range of options. you pick a price that works for you. perfect. only one thing could make t
in the capital of cirri, damascus. rupert murdoch is expected to arrive in london shortly to take challenge of the phone hacking crisis. it has led to the closure of this sunday's edition. the editor of the newspaper until 2007 has been released on bail after being interviewed about allegations of corruption. >> what happened? have written better if he were -- and the probably been better if he were still at the helm. concern -- conspiracy and corruption. finding himself in the political doc, the prime minister decided to plead guilty for failing to take seriously the epidemic of phone hacking. >> we turned a blind eye to the need to sort this issue, to get on top of bad practices, to change the way newspapers are related. we have not correct this issue. >> their work, though, mitigating circumstances. he, like other politicians, wanted the papers to help him win. >> a relationship that came too close, became too cozy. do we spend enough time asking questions about how these organizations are regulated, and malpractice and the rest of it? no, we did not. >> david cameron was warned before t
titan rupert murdoch. it was a big day for sales this morning as they said thanks and good-bye. >> yeah. there was a lot of interest. of course, some organizations are actually calling for a boycott today to show their fury at what happened. last week, let's remember, this was the biggest selling pap ner britain with an unrivaled reputation for journalistic scoop spots. the press itself fell silent this morning for the final time. and this is the last edition. so it has been a very long week on what we call fleet street here in britain. it's also been a very uncomfortable week for media boss rupert murdoch. >> reporter: for millions in britain, sunday morning involves a walk to the news agent to pick up "news of the world." a ritual their parents, grandparents, even great grandparents would recognize. but with thank you and good-bye, today is their last chance. the 168-year-old tabloid that thrived on scandal and exposie ing hypocrisy has itself been destroyed by a scandal of its own. the paper is being investigated for paying police for information and allegation of voice mail hacking.
dad did, my grandfather did and it's what we do today. from the embattled press baron rupert murdoch to the polo playing prince william and his bride stories with the british connection have been very much in the news this past week. ben tracy will have more on the royal tour of california. but first elizabeth palmer in london with the latest on the end of the world, at least for the world's newspaper, that is. >> reporter: the last edition of the news of the world was a proud farewell that recalled 168 years of sunday scoops. rupert murdoch bought the paper in 1969 and used its profits to build his vast media empire that now includes fox news, the wall street journal, and the new york post. but this week this scrappy tabloid was engulfed by scandal. though it remained one of the best-selling newspapers in the english speaking world its name is disgraced and the fallout has damaged politicians, the police and the formidable mr. murdoch. the scandal exploded with a teenager murdered in 2002. on monday in london, a private investigator working for the news of the world was accused of h
edition of britain's "news of the world" on the stands rupert murdoch arrived in london today. his company's british subsidiary closed it after news that they hacked the phone of a teenager who was dead. >>> a strong earthquake rocked japan's northeastern quake. today's 7.1 tremor prompted tsunami add advisories later canceled. there are no reports of injuries or damage. >>> china no longer a rising world power. instead china has arrived. those words today from the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mike mullen in beijing in a four-week visit. china's growing military strength comes with an obligation to the world. >> greater military power must come greater responsibility, greater cooperation and just as important, greater transparency. without these things the expansion of military power in your region rather than making it more secure and stable, could have the opposite effect. >> this china trip is one of admiral mullen's final acts as joint chiefs chairman. he retires this fall. now to the white house where in just four hours, heated deficit reduction talks could further in
of the world's largest and oldest newspapers owned by media mogul rupert murdoch. new signs that it could have spread all of the way to the u.s. jeffrey kofman has more for us. >> good morning to you, robin. here's the final issue of the news of the world. this scandal did not die with the death of the newspaper. all eyes on a huge american company, news corporation. rupert murdoch rushed to london to try to contain the damage. while he arrived he was reading the last news of the world. his empire now under siege. in its pursuit of sensational stories the news of the world crossed the line into criminal activity. the public has lost faith. >> i think it does need to go for what it's done. >> reporter: rebeck kari brooks, she was editor a decade ago. she gets to keep her job and so does james murdoch who runs the british arm of the company. he, too, said it wasn't his fault. >> i acted on the advice of executives and lawyers with a completion investigation. >> reporter: the ultimate boss james could face prosecution under u.s. and british business law. if convicted, jail time. >> while brooks a
both the reputation and the share price of mr. murdoch's media empire just as he seeks to expand it here in britain. police are continuing their investigation. meanwhile there will be a government inquiry into the very nature of tabloid journalism here in britain. >> is there still talk that the employees that lost their jobs might be redistributed to "the sun" newspaper and start printing a sunday edition which is also owned by the murdoches? >> reporter: there has been speculation that perhaps we will see a "sun" on sunday. no confirmation of that. it has been striking that of all the journalists, 200 or so who lost their jobs last week without any warning whatsoever, very few have come forward with any overt criticism of how they've been treated. so leads one to suspect that perhaps they hold out some expectation that there will be a future job for them at some point within the overall stable of news international. >> certainly the store i have is far from over. anna bell roberts, thanks, appreciate it vrnlths one of latin america's most popular singers is dead. cabral was kil
told to be cool. >>> there's huge breaking news in england where rupert murdoch's 168-year-old "news of the world" rolled off the presses for the last time. his empire is in jeopardy over a phone hacking scandal. murdock has now spoken publicly for the first time. we'll tell you what he's saying. and big sports news derek jeter getting hit number 3,000 with a home run. what did the guy who caught the ball do with it? we'll tell you about that, coming up. >>> we begin with the make or break meeting at the white house today and the crucial debt negotiations that seem to have hit a serious road block overnight. abc's david kerley following the developments through the night. he is live in washington this morning. i guess it all comes down to the issue of taxes. >> reporter: it does. it is all about taxes. and this is a stunning move by the house speaker. on the eve of some of the biggest policy talks in decades, he basically says, i can't do it. overnight, house speaker john boehner threw a buckck of cold water on the talks, saying that because, quote, the white house will not pursue a
everyone. >>> rupert murdoch is in damage control mode over the growing phone hacking scandal at one of his british newspapers. murdoch arrives in london today. reporters for the 168-year-old "news of the world" are accused of hacking cell phones of crime victim, celebrities and politicians. three people have been arrested and the weekly tabloid is ceasing publication tomorrow. >>> the obama administration is sending a strong signal to anti-government protesters in searia. the u.s. ambassador to syria met demonstrators on the streets of the besieged city friday. hundreds of thousands greeted him with roses and olive branches. >>> citizens of the world's newest nation were literally dancing in the streets. south sudan is celebrating its independence from sudan after decades of civil war. south sudan is expected next week to become the 193rd country recognized by the united nations. >>> astronauts aboard "atlantis" will spend most of their first full day looking for damage. the liftoff of the shuttle went off almost without a hitch. a crowd of almost a million turned out to watch that launch.
turning against him. >> reporter: murdoch shut down the "news of the world" because of what was described as toxic culture. but the company is fighting back against allegations involving two of the other papers, "the sun" and "the sunday times." they wanted to get a 2006 article about his child's cystic fi breaux says, suggesting their methods may have been illegal. a new statement from new international denies any wrong doing and said the story "the sun" ran about their son originated from a member of public whose family has also experienced cystic fibrosis. but damage to the company may have already been done. some say it is about time. including actor hugh grant who in recent months has led his own campaign against the tabloid. even recording this conversation with the deputy editor of "news of the world" last april. mcmullen did not know he was being recorded acknowledged hacking was wide spread. >> but celebrities themselves, you would justify because they're rich? >> yeah, mean, if you don't like it you've just got get off the stage. >> reporter: they call it a publicity stunt. not
in this tough economy. >>> damage control, rupert murdoch, the observer of the "wall street journal" and fox news travels to london today to take control of the hacking scandal surrounding his london tabloid that is sending shock waves through the british government. we'll talk to the lawyer of a family of this little girl who touched off this growing firestorm. >>> and royal invasion. after conquering canada, prince william and his wife catherine hit l.a., where they could outshine some of hollywood's brightest stars. "early" this saturday morning, july 9th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a picture perfect day in the big city. i'm russ mitchell. >> i'm rebecca jarvis. from the jobs to the royals and the shuttle launch and to betty ford. >> a courageous first lady who battled addiction to pain killers and addiction to alcohol and defeating breast cancer. she died in palm springs, california, she was 93 years old. scott pelley takes a look back at her remarkable life. >> reporter: relatively unknown until her husband became president, betty ford became one of the most popular a
with the latest. >> rupert murdoch bought "news of the world" but it has been loved by readers and feared by the politicians, celebrities and royals that it has regularly exposed. in its final edition editors asked the reading public not to judge the paper by this scandal but instead by its years in print. with the ink barely dry on the final edition of "the news of the world" rupert murdoch traveled to the uk to manage the damage control personally. on display his so far unqualified support from rebecca brooks, former editor of the paper and now a trusted executive at news corp. smiles for the cameras but calls for hooks to resign are growing louder. one of the most damaging allegations the paper faces is a phone hacking of a 13-year-old murder victim. charismatic redhead was editor of "news of the world "account at the time. >> if she goes that puts a spotlight on rupert murdoch's son james and if he is vulnerable rupert murdoch is himself. >> reporter: he is widely seen as his father's heir apparent. >> james murdoch and rebecca brooks cannot deny responsibility. >> reporter: brook cli
'll bring it to you live. after 168 years, newscorp ceo rupert murdoch has decided to shut down the best selling newspaper because of a scandal. skye news reporter joins us from london with the very latest. >> well, here at the former headquarters of the news of the world, there is very little activity but as you say, after 168 years, the news of the world is no more. but earlier today, about 12:00 u.k. time, rupert murdoch arrived at the headquarters. he was in the front passenger seat of a red range rover. he was holding up and reading what appears to be the latest, the final edition of the news of the world newspaper. he was here relatively briefly and then left shortly after. really, he is here in the u.k. for two main reasons. the first is to take control of the handling of this phone hacking situation. that has really put a cloud over the news of the world newspaper at news international and also has been for -- i think really that is crucial for rupert murdoch and the reason that he is in the u.k. today, the amount of money, revenue that newscorp could bring in did go through, wh
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)